Modena Trattoria Aldina, a Review

The Trattoria Aldina is a restaurant that offers traditional Emilian dishes, and it’s located in Modena inside a building that houses other businesses, so it’s actually quite easy to miss the entrance. But the restaurant, its address being Via Luigi Albinelli 40, is off the beaten path going towards the city center and as such it’s frequented largely by locals, which is all the more reason to dine here, surrounded by friendly staff and true, homemade local dishes. The atmosphere in here makes it so that it feels like you’re about to have a hearty Sunday meal at an aunt or a grandma’s house, and since the restaurant is on the first floor, the overall appearance of the place is that of a real Italian house. Booking is not possible unless you plan on dining here with a group of people, but it’s fairly easy to be seated – you might have to wait just a little while at most.
The pasta-based dishes are excellent and 8 euros for a dish of tortellini in broth is truly a deal! The quality of the courses offered is amazing, especially when compared to the affordable prices. The ratio between quality and price is outstanding since the dishes of homemade fresh pasta with or without filling (tagliatelle, tortellini, tortelli, lasagne and more) cost only 7/8 euros.

The dishes I decided to order and try are as follows, but the choice spans across most of the traditional dishes and courses of a typical Emilian meal, and it ranges from different kinds of pasta, filled pasta (with diverse and seasonal fillings to satisfy every palate), second courses of meats, including veal, and a choice of side dishes (baked vegetables, mashed potatoes and so on) and cheeses.

I ordered a classic dish of tortellini in broth, a staple in the Emilian tradition, especially here in Modena, that proved to be excellent and affordable; as a second course, I strayed from the usual that would have customers order more traditional dishes such as pork shin-bone or tagliata, to order a horse meat tartare that was fairly good. As for what concerns the desserts, I tried both the excellent zuppa inglese (a trifle made with layered custard, chocolate cream, and sponge cake dipped in Alchermes) and the panna cotta with a red berries syrup that was quite good – the desserts available might change from day to day but the pillars of Italian cuisine are usually always on the menu, including tiramisu, mascarpone and more.

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Great tortellini in brodo at Aldina’s – only 8 euros.
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Panna cotta – Zuppa inlgese – Tartare di cavallo – Tortellini

Coffee: Become a Master Barista With This Masterclass in Italy

Being a barista is something that can be done wherever there is a coffee house, but the role finds its roots in the Italian tradition of coffee making, and with the Terzi Coffee School you can finally learn this incredible and refined trade.

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Terzi coffee shop where you can become a certified barista.

The Terzi Coffeehouses of Italy provide the chance to take part in lessons and courses at the Terzi School for Coffee and Foodies, located in Vignola, no matter your starting skill level. Coffee lovers, baristas and tourists who seek a truly Italian hands-on experience will be taught by an English-speaking (other languages available) master barista all about the different types and techniques of coffee making and most of the classes – that range between short, half-day ones, one-day experiences and multi-day classes – also include breakfast, lunch and/or dinner of the best local Emilia Romagna dishes.

The aim of the owner of Caffè Terzi of Italy, Mr. Manuel Terzi, is to spread his knowledge and coffee expertise to anyone who’s willing to learn. The school doesn’t just cater to those who wish to become more familiar with the world of coffee, but also to foodies and food-lovers, and the school offers insight about the best dishes of Italian cuisine, the best pairings between coffee and cheese, information about coffee beans and all you wanted to know about the history of coffee, the methods to harvest and grind the beans, the equipment needed for the Italian techniques as well as the other methods of extraction available and also how to make the perfect drink (you can learn over 125 coffee drinks!), latte art, and the perfect cappuccino.

There are many online courses about the art of coffee making, but the Terzi School offers a first-person experience, with focused training, not detached demonstrations. The participants will take part in the activities and will be engaged in an all-around experience in a friendly atmosphere, with small classes that allow for individual attention for optimal learning. The course will be tailored on your needs, and there are many curricula available on the school’s website to choose from. Registration is easy and the prices range from 35€ for a simple lunch/dinner to join your friends who have taken part in a class (this option doesn’t include the class itself), to 195€ for a 4hrs class where you can learn how to make the perfect espresso or cappuccino, and up to more expensive classes for the coffee die-hards who want to know everything about coffee roasting. Barista classes are available for beginners (3.5hrs/195€), intermediate participants (4.5hrs/250€) or advanced baristas (8hrs/495€), so that anyone with any level of experience can find the course that best fits their wishes.

The world of coffee is wonderful, and perhaps a bit complicated at first glance, but the Terzi School of Italy just opened its doors and it’s a chance to learn all you wanted to know about coffee you just can’t miss.

Pavarotti Museum Finally Opens in Modena

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Pavarotti singing in Italy – source

On the occasion of Expo 2015 in Milan, even Modena, together with Luciano Pavarotti Foundation, decides to exceptionally open to the public the doors of Casa Pavarotti that have been transformed into a House-Museum thanks to a path that will permit his fans to better know Luciano Pavarotti both as famous tenor and man.
The visit of the House-Museum in Stradello Nava is part of the Discover Ferrari & Pavarotti Land tour, organised by Modena to show to the tourists the beauties of the city.

In the past, the Foundation opened the House just for special occasions so it is the first time that everyone is allowed to enter the House transformed into a Museum. This decision has been taken to never forget the name of Luciano Pavarotti, and it is even the main reason that encouraged Nicoletta Mantovani (Pavarotti’s wife) to start the Foundation in 2007, after the tenor’s death.

The Museum remains intentionally more in the dimension of a House because the Foundation wants to show how the tenor lived, in other words they want the public to know Luciano, rather than Pavarotti.
For example, an aspect that surely will help us to know him as a simple man is the area of the House that he decided to consecrate to his horses: here he opened a real horseback riding school and for 11 years, he has hosted a prestigious hurdle jumping competition.
Another peculiarity is that it was Pavarotti who designed the House, and the architects followed meticulously his plans while realizing the construction. So the House reflects the personality of the tenor in each detail; it treasures all his photos and memories with the most important people of his life, his friends, his family, his daughter.
What’s more, visiting the House-Museum you will have the chance to admire the clothes he wore during his most beautiful performances, the videos of the several Pavarotti & friends that took place in Modena as well the innumerable awards he gained during his 40-year-career in many theaters all over the world.

The Museum will be open to the public 7 days a week; the public will have the chance to carry out a guided tour based on a service of audio-guides in Italian, English, French, German, Spanish, Arabic, Chinese and Russian, that will guide the visitors throughout the House.
Some rooms are the same as when Pavarotti was alive, as his bedroom and the kitchen, while some others have been set up with a sort of path that retrace his career, with his works, pictures with famous people and friends, awards and so on.

Transforming the House into Museum has not be so easy, on the contrary it has been a very demanding project for the Foundation, but the target to let everyone know how the so well-known tenor lived his everyday life, has been reached. 

If you are visiting Modena you should also consider to visit Enzo Ferrari museum.

Musa – the First Charcuterie Museum in Italy.

The first charcuterie museum in Italy, “MUSA”, introduces its visitors to multiple aspects, stages and perspectives of traditional meat curing process. Founded in 2013, the three story building is located in Castelnuovo Rangone, Modena, Italy right next to the headquarters of Villani Salami plant – the oldest and biggest regional salami producing company, which has been sustaining the craft of charcuterie producing for over 120 years. Throughout the galleries of the museum building, its multimedia booths, glassy models and other thematic images visitors are brought into the atmosphere of gastronomic heritage and of meat gourmet preparation all across Italy. The itinerary incorporates ten major parts maintaining a balanced mix of the practical side of sliced-ham making along with the spirit and the pride artisans take in their work.

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A Tribute to the History of Charcuterie

With the opening of Museo della Salumeria the commune of Castelnuovo Rangone (MO) pays tribute to the Villani S.p.A – a family-owned charcuterie production business existing since 1886, currently exporting cured meat to over fifty countries around the world. The gallery hallways feature the memorable images of historical tools, techniques and artifacts used in the old times for curing salami, mortadella and many other renowned culinary delights. As time shows, the salami-making process cannot be fully replaced by advanced technologies and modern equipment. The successful combination of novelty coordinated with manual approach and professional human skills is what makes the Italian-made charcuterie a one-of-a-kind delicacy.

Inside the Museum: Aesthetical and Educational Value

The visit course is divided into ten different sections each covering a particular aspect of the meat preparation process: curing, braising, trussing, slicing and more. The 3D crystal mock-ups of trussed meat on display, hanging platters of flowery cold cuts and other descriptive imagery convey the concept and culture of the multistage cooking course. Apart from getting impressed by the appetizing interior design, guests can gain knowledge about the various phases of the famous salami making. Throughout the course of years evolution of the product can be traced; the global tendency of healthy lifestyle in today’s world has imprinted itself in the manufacturing of the cold cuts as well: sliced ham contains less salt and fat complying with international food standards. By following the historical thread of the charcuterie evolution one gets the impression of what stands behind the legendary gastronomic delight: technique and precision side-by-side with passionate appreciation and dedication to work. Visitors expressing real-time interest to the cooking details may be armed with practical knowledge by gaining it from videos, textbooks and other visual aids available in respective halls – guidelines and old recipes are offered for public use.

Tastings and Social Events

Besides getting acquainted with the museum itinerary through texts and films, guests are welcome to take action by participating in guided tours, tastings and social themed gatherings. Gastronomic workshops are available upon request and the production department of salami Villani factory is open for visits as well for groups of at least 10 visitors

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What to do in MODENA in three hours

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Visit the perimeter of Maserati factory, you can spot many Maserati super cars running around, and see them test driven.

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The Maserati factory has a small showroom where you can see the cars but you can also buy Maserati gadgets, T-shirt and so on. You do not need any appointment to go to the showroom, you can just turn up. However factory tours are harder to get.

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This is the Maserati tower it is the headquarter of the company, note the Trident which is the symbol of the Maserati and it is sitting on top of the building, the Trident  was chosen as it was also represented in the Piazza Maggiore fountain in Bologna.

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Nearby you can find another supercar Museum. It is just five minutes away, it is Casa Natale Enzo Ferrari, and it is located at his house where the car maker was born, now it is a museum with plenty to see.

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This is the main building of the Ferrari Museum and host many super car collection that are changed regularly. From here you can also take a shuttle bus and go to Marenello, where the other Ferrari Museum is.

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This is the oldest delicatessen in the world it was open in 1605, it belonged to the GIUSTI family for a very long time. They were salami and ham makers in Modena and their products were exported all over Europe. Now is still a deli but also a renowned restaurant, featuring traditional fare but make sure that you book well in advance. It is open only for lunch.

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In Modena people eat your gnocco fritto, it is a local speciality, it is simply a fried dumpling but is very tasty as it is fried in pork fat. You can order it for breakfast with your espresso. Or have it for dinner with slices of Parma ham.

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This mercato Albinelli, here are you can buy many local specialties and super fresh meat, fish vegetables and fruits. It is in liberty style and built at the beginning of the 19th century. It is a focal point of the city, if you want to see the locals and what they eat, mercato Albinelli is the right place.

Modena’s Chef Massimo Bottura Wins Gastronomy Nobel Prize

Massimo Bottura is a world renowned chef and food connoisseur. With a global following, Chef Bottura has dazzled countless enthusiasts with mouth watering dishes and world class cuisine. As the proud owner of Osteria Francescana, the Italian sensation has also received stellar reviews from fans and industry critics alike. As a true master of the culinary arts, Chef Bottura recently captured the Nobel Prize for gastronomy. This prestigious award is courtesy of The White Guide, which honors contemporary chefs that have displayed unparalleled creativity and ingenuity each year. As the latest recipient of this unique award, Chef Bottura is truly honored to add this priceless achievement and accolade to his repertoire.

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Massimo Bottura in Modena

Over the years, the award has been presented to chefs that have simply outshined their competitors. More importantly, the prize pays homage and truly honors culinary specialists that have soared to new heights in this diverse and challenging industry. According to the judges, Bottura is an immensely talented and innovative chef that has gone above and beyond the call of duty. In fact, his artistry has truly enhanced common meals into fine works of art. From tantalizing dishes to scrumptious entrees, Massimo has fused traditional and contemporary delights to facilitate a broad range of tastes and preferences. For this reason, Bottura received the Nobel Prize and was honored for being a major force in this evolving and fast paced field.

The award ceremony took place in Stockholm in front of countless chefs and industry leaders. The event also spotlighted Bottura’s restaurant, as well as his past achievements in culinary excellence. As a former chef in Monaco, Massimo is known to create spectacular dishes by utilizing traditional and common ingredients. He has also appeared in several cooking magazines and books, and has a worldwide social media following. If you love innovative cooking and want to learn from the best, Chef Bottura can turn your dreams into realities. Simply read his books “Cook It Raw” and “Where Chefs Eat” for mouthwatering recipes and more information.

Who is Massimo Bottura?

A true son of Emilia Romagna, the culinary capital of Italy, Massimo Bottura was born in Modena in September 1962 and is one of a growing band of innovative chefs that are pushing the boundaries of food and dining as we have come to know them. Massimo’s first experience of food and ingredients came from the many hours he claims he spent under his grandmother’s kitchen table, where he went to seek refuge from his older brothers. Here, at her knee, his great love affair with all things culinary began, and he took the first steps of his journey to the culinary excellence that would one day see his restaurant receiving no less than 3 Michelin stars.

A bit about his background.

Massimo did not initially set out to become a chef; he was studying law in 1986, when he heard that a roadside trattoria on the outskirts of Modena was for sale. He decided to take a break from his studies, bought and renovated the building and a week later he opened his first restaurant, the Trattoria del Campazzo; the rest, as they say, is history and the law faculty’s loss was the Culinary world’s gain.

It was not an overnight success story for Massimo Bottura, but rather a journey of discovery as he first apprenticed with Chef Georges Cogny, where the foundations of his culinary knowledge were laid down with a good grounding in the principles of regional Italian cooking combined with classic French cuisine. He later worked with renowned chefs Alain Ducasse (Hotel de Paris in Monte Carlo) and Ferran Adria of El Bulli fame in Spain.

Massimo opens his restaurant in his home town: Modena.

In 1995 he opened Osteria Francescana in the medieval city centre of his home town, Modena, with the intention of combining contemporary art, traditional Italian cuisine and his now-renowned innovative genius. In the following years Massimo and Osteria Francescana received numerous awards, including his first Michelin Star in 2002. A second star followed in 2006 and in 2012 he received his third Michelin star, making him one of only 7 Italian chefs to have been so honoured.
In addition, Osteria Francescana was named the Best Italian Restaurant in the world, and the 4th Best Restaurant in the World in 2011, on The World’s 50 Best Restaurant List. In the latest list for 2013, he has climbed yet another rung of the ladder and is placed at no 3!

The signature dishes of Massimo Bottura.

And the food, you may ask… Massimo himself describes each of his innovative dishes as being a reconstruction of an idea, a memory or a smile, and since he has lived in Modena all his life, the region plays an important role in his food. To whet your appetite, here are a couple of the dishes which will be served for his New Year’s Eve dinner – dedicated to his friends around the world with inspiring dishes from all corners of the globe. From Italy comes Sea urchin spaghetti in the Neopolitan tradition with aglio, olio e peperoncino (olive oil, garlic and chilli), from France there is Foie gras and white truffle (a marriage of French and Italian delicacies) in an Emilian ravioli. Nordic countries are represented by the Aurora borealis dish – porcini, black truffles, chestnuts, chocolate and pumpkin beneath a blanket of leaves.

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Massimo at a recent food event in Modena

Supercars, Super Foods of Modena

Connoisseurs of wonderful cars and superb cuisine will find a holiday in the delightful medieval town of Modena in northern Italy most rewarding.  Modena and near-by Parma are the home of Italy’s greatest exports, Parma Ham, Parmesan Cheese, Balsamic vinegar and, of course, Ferrari and Maserati.  Plan your next holiday to include enough time in this region to get a true taste of some of the best that Italy has to offer.  Here are some of the attractions that you must include in your holiday plans.

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Cathedral of Modena

Hombre Farm – Motorvalley Panini Collection Tour.

Matteo Panini is a young farmer in the region, one of many Parmesan cheese producers, who also happens to  have an amazing collection of motor vehicles which have been passed down to him from his illustrious family which included his father Umberto, who together with his brothers Benito, Franco and Guiseppe, invented the famous Panini stickers.

The motor collection started with tractors, which all farmers needed, and one of the exhibits is a 1934 Landini, still in perfect working order.  After tractors came motorcycles, the most common mode of transport after WWII, and after that came the wonderful cars, featuring examples from Maserati that are thought to be the most important collection of these super cars in the world.  In addition to Italian motor vehicles, there are also many examples from other countries such as British motorbikes from Norton, and even a Messerschmitt car and a Lotus!

A visit to the Hombre farm is an excellent family day trip.  First visit the dairy, where 12 wheels of Parmesan are produced daily, and then enjoy the motor museum.

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The Maserati Eldorado at the Panini Museum

Osteria Francescana

No culinary visit to Modena would be complete without having a meal at this wonderful restaurant, the brain-child of world-renowned chef Massimo Bottura, who grew up in Modena and developed his love of cooking by watching his mother prepare food.  Massimo has come a long way since then!  His food is a modern interpretation of classic Italian cuisine, but this chef, who has worked with some of the big names of the culinary world, such as Alain Ducasse and Ferran Adrio (of El Bulli) is forever pushing the boundaries.  He won his first Michelin star in 2002, a second in 2006 and a third in 2011, as well as numerous other awards and distinctions.  This year, 2013, La Francescana came in 3rd of the 50 best restaurants in the world.  Of course you have to book well in advance, and of course it is expensive, but it is worth it!  His signature dish for 2013 is called Camouflage – a hare in the woods; it is made up of a thin layer of foie gras decorated with various powders composed of hare blood, chestnut and several herbs – perhaps this dish is not for everyone, but it is an example of the chefs’ innovation.  Of course, there are more conventional dishes to suit all palates.

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Chef Massimo Bottura at his restaurant La Francescana in Modena – Source

Traditional Balsamic Vinegar of Modena

Genuine Balsamic Vinegar has been produced in Modena for centuries, and is a unique artisanal product, completely unlike regular vinegar.  The basic ingredient is grape Must (juice) from predominantly Trebbiano grapes (sometimes with the addition of Lambrusco grapes).  The must is simmered (never boiled!) for a lengthy period to reduce and concentrate the liquid.  This liquid is then allowed to ferment and mature for a minimum of 12 years in the case on a “true” Balsamic.  This wonderful product, known as Black Gold, can sometimes be matured as long as 25 years and a new batch is traditionally started to mark the birth of a baby girl, and treasured to become a part of her dowry!  Balsamic vinegar should be used sparingly – just a drop or two to enhance a sliver of Parmesan or a slice of Parma Ham.  Make sure to visit one of the Balsamic producers of Modena during your visit to learn the process of the production, learn how to use it, taste the wonderful nectar and, of course, buy some to take home with you to remind you of Modena.

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Channel 4 “Food Unwrapped” comes to Modena to discover balsamic vinegar.

The British Television Channel 4  has dedicated one of the episodes of “Food unwrapped” to Balsamic vinegar. The food program is a TV series broadcast between 2012 and 2013 in the UK and aimed to discover the reality of food. The program compares and investigates  what goes into what we eat.

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Food Unwrapped in Modena – source

In late March we were contacted by a subsidiary of Channel 4, in order to organise the shooting of the programme in Modena. With only one day to put together an itinerary for the crew, we worked hard to come up with the best ideas. Emilia Delizia organised a pick up for the crew, a English speaking guide, hotel accommodation, and a tour to three different balsamic vinegar producers. To make the programme comparative we selected 3 of them. One producer of PGI Balsamic vinegar, one producer of DOP vinegar and a producer of organic balsamic condiment. In short we provided them with a real insight of the vinegar industry.

Emilia Delizia selected Giusti as one of the best candidate for the shooting, as we reckoned they had the best array of products and also the longest experience in the field. The shooting went particularly well and the show presenter and celebrity chef Matt Tebbutt seemed to enjoy his time with Claudio Stefani during his discovery of Traditional balsamic vinegar DOP and the PGI vinegar.

DOP tradizionale Balsamic vinegar VS PGI Balsamic vinegar of Modena.

These are 2 quite different products that are both made in Modena. While the DOP version has to observe strict regulation imparted by the consortium, The PGI vinegar (PGI stands for Protected Geographic Indication) falls in a much more open domain of production where rules are much more permissive. However PGI Balsamic vinegar of Modena does not always mean to be industrial, with ample use of colouring and preservatives. In fact some of the PGI versions of the famous Modena vinegar can be very good without any additives and sold at a very fair price.

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Matt Tebbutt and Claudio in Modena

Giusti – Balsamic vinegar producer in Modena.

Giusti is the oldest and most prestigious company of Balsamic Vinegar of Modena. Founded in 1605 and at the 17th generation, this family company was awarded with quality recognitions since 1800’s, when 14 gold medals were granted in Exhibitions like Florence 1861, Paris 1889 and 1900. Also, Giusti was bestowed with the Patent of the King of Italy as sole balsamic vinegar supplier.

Today Giusti boasts proudly the most important collection of ancient casks and barrels in the world of balsamic vinegar: more than 600 casks, all dating back to 1800’s and 1700’s, drawing flavors and aromas created centuries ago. This impressive collection, still perfectly working and producing excellent balsamic vinegars, can be visited in the old attics of the country house where Giusti vinegar is made, and where there is an internal museum with old objects from the history of Balsamic Vinegar.

The Giusti collection offers a range of high quality balsamic vinegars of various ageing,  up to the oldest ones. They can be found in the most exclusive gourmet shops, and they are interpreted by the best chefs in the world. Like the “3 Gold Medals, Riccardo Giusti”, done with late grapes, extremely thick and sweet, aged for more 12 years, awarded best balsamic vinegar in Italy, Germany and US; the “Banda Rossa”, a delicious 20 years old Balsamic Vinegar, given by the grandfather Giuseppe Giusti as a special family gift in the 1960’s. The oldest Traditional Balsamic Vinegars of Modena DOP complete the offer .

The Giusti family is happy to welcome food lovers from all over the world, offering free guided tours with tastings of all his Balsamic Vinegars, to explore the origins, the history and legends, and how is made, one of the most celebrated Italian products all over the world.

 Emilia Delizia and the Media.

Our company welcomes enquiries from the media about exploring Italian famous food products. If you are looking to produce a TV program, or a newspaper article we would be glad to help to get the best out of your time in Italy. It might be very complicated even for the most experienced journalist to have a real insight of the topic. Emilia Delizia has a long experience in the field and we would be happy to help you to put together your story.

Balsamic vinegar tour in Modena – EmiliaDelizia.com

Modena and the traditional balsamic vinegar produced here are truly Italian gems of uniqueness.

 

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Cathedral of Modena

The Duomo di Modena is part of the Unesco world’s heritage and it is something really markable that you should not miss. It is almost 1000 years old and build only from scrap marbled derived from ancient Roman villas. The Duomo has been built according the Romanesque style by the masters of Campione D’Italia. The structure celebrates Modena’s patron and protector San Geminiano.

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100 ml bottle of balsamic vinegar of Modena

Hidden in the family’s  home attics there is another treasure: Traditional Balsamic vinegar of Modena. Only made by the Modenese families in small batches and aged up to 25 years, it is a remarkable pearl in the Italian gastronomic tradition. It requires a set of barrels made of noble woods, Lambrusco grape juice and a lot of patience. Every year the producers have to painstakingly refill the barrels since some of the liquid is lost due to natural evaporation during the hot summers. However this allows to blend the flavours of the woods into the final product.

 

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trying the balsamic vinegar

The traditional balsamic vinegar of Modena has basically nothing to do with lower quality vinegar even when marketed as MODENA’S. During the tasting we will discover how to distinguish the black nectar from its numerous imitations. The tasting is aimed to develop an appreciation for the producer and learn how to match it with foods. Even though it is seen by many as an expensive and eccentric product it can be used on everyday’s foods. If used correctly a bottle will last for long time.

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The balsamic vinegar barrels

During Emilia Delizia’s Traditional Balsamic Vinegar tour we will learn how the fractional ageing works and each detail of the production will be explained to our guests. For those wishing to take home some of the product is now possible to purchase the 100 ml bottles directly from the producer at discounted prices. Some producers are also happy to send their products directly to your home and almost all accept all major credit cards.

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The Ghirlandina tower of Modena

Even though Modena is small, it is a true concentration of history, architecture and food delicacies. If you want to truly sample the city we recommend to spend at least one night and a full day. Modena is also famous for Parmesan cheese, pasta like tortellini, Zampone and cotechino and there is an endless array of good restaurants in the city centre. Ranging from cheap eat to Bottura’s Osteria Francescana, Modena is set to please everyone in terms of food.

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Ferrari museum in central Modena

Modena is also the capital of motor sport, and super cars. The newly open Enzo Ferrari museums is an interesting hot spot for those fanatic about the Ferrari cars. The modern building offers themed and rotating car collections that express the soul Modena. It is also possible to catch a shuttle bus and visit the Maranello Ferrari museum without the need of hiring a car.