Top Visits: A Journey to Discover Maturing Aceto Balsamico di Reggio Emilia Producers in Emilia Romagna

Deep in the heartland of Northern Italy lies Emilia Romagna, a region steeped in history and renowned for its culinary delights. Rich in cultural and food traditions, it’s the place to indulge in fine, quality food and drink. Yet beyond its famed Prosciutto di Parma and Parmigiano Reggiano cheese, Emilia Romagna hides another jewel – the Aceto Balsamico Tradizionale di Reggio Emilia, or Traditional Balsamic Vinegar of Reggio Emilia. This region is home to some of Italy’s finest balsamic vinegar producers.

Aceto Balsamico Tradizionale is made from cooked grape must, aged through a long aging process in wooden casks, which gives it a complex, sweet, and aromatic profile, unlike the often more diluted commercial-grade balsamic vinegars readily available in supermarkets. The crafting process of this delicacy is meticulous and steeped in tradition, characteristics that reflect the spirit of Emilia Romagna itself.

Here is a list of the finest Aceto Balsamico di Reggio Emilia Producers you should not miss when visiting Parma.

1. Acetaia San Giacomo:

Located in Novellara, a village in the Reggio Emilia province, Acetaia San Giacomo is a must-visit. The owner, Andrea Bezzechi, is one of the most respected balsamic vinegar masters, and will immerse you in the refined world of traditional balsamic vinegar production. Visitors can tour the acetaia, witness the painstaking process of the balsamic vinegar making and, of course, sample the beautifully matured elixir.

2. Cavalli Acetaia:

Located in Scandiano, near Parma, the Cavalli family has been producing traditional balsamic vinegar for centuries. Visitors can tour the historic cellars packed with barrels dating back to the 1800s, and learn about the detailed process that goes into producing their richly flavored, aromatic vinegar. Tastings are complemented by other local products such as cheeses and cured meats.

3. Acetaia Boni Romano:

In the charming municipality of Cavriago, deep among the Reggiano hills, you will find the family-run Acetaia Boni Romano. Here, the Boni family shares their passion for the ancient tradition of vinegar-making. Visitors are treated to a guided tour of the vinegar loft, and a tasting that involves three different ages of Balsamic Vinegar.

4. Acetaia Claudia:

Situated in the foothills of Reggio Emilia, Acetaia Claudia showcases the charm of family-run vinegar production in Italy. You can take a leisurely trip around their vinegar loft, see where the magic happens, and expand your knowledge about vinegar aging process.

Each of these producers offer something unique, and visiting them offers not only an insight into the traditional process of creating Aceto Balsamico di Reggio Emilia, but also provides a visceral connection to the land, the tradition, and the people behind this remarkable product.

Visiting these Aceto Balsamico di Reggio Emilia producers is a fascinating addition to a stay in Parma, providing a deeper appreciation of Emilia Romagna’s culinary culture, and a deeper understanding of the region’s gastronomic heritage. You get to sip, savour, and appreciate what truly sets this vinegar apart from the rest – it’s not just a culinary experience, but a journey into the heart of Emilia Romagna.

A Guide to Visiting the Best Aceto Balsamico Producers in Reggio Emilia: An Authentic Culinary Experience

Emilia-Romagna, the foodie heartland of Italy, stretches from the Apennine Mountains to the fertile plains of the Po River. Best known for its culinary triumphs like Prosciutto di Parma, Parmigiano Reggiano, and Aceto Balsamico Tradizionale, it provides an irresistible lure for those who love authentic Italian food. Among these gastronomic gems, Aceto Balsamico, or balsamic vinegar, holds a unique spot owing to its centuries-old tradition and an exquisite flavor profile. This rich, dark, sweet-yet-sour liquid, made from grape must, is meticulously aged in wooden barrels for at least a dozen years.

Reggio Emilia, one of the only two certified production areas alongside Modena, hosts some of the best Aceto Balsamico producers who still uphold the traditional methods. Embarking on a culinary tour here should be nothing less than a gastronome’s thrilling sojourn.

Reggio Emilia, an enchanting city with a rich historical tapestry, offers visitors more than just its famed culinary delights. The city is renowned for its well-preserved architecture and vibrant cultural scene. Key landmarks include the Teatro Municipale Valli, a splendid 19th-century opera house that is the centerpiece of the city’s cultural life, hosting regular opera, ballet, and classical music performances. The Basilica della Ghiara, built in the 17th century, is famous for its sumptuous baroque interiors and exquisite frescoes that draw art lovers and pilgrims alike.

Another must-visit is the Palazzo Magnani, a beautiful historical building that often hosts art exhibitions. For a deeper dive into local history, the Musei Civici offers a fascinating look at the archaeological and ethnographic history of the region. The Piazza Prampolini at the heart of the city, with the impressive Duomo di Reggio Emilia facing the bustling square, is perfect for experiencing the local lifestyle and architecture.

For those traveling from Parma, a visit to Reggio Emilia offers a contrasting experience that complements the rich culinary and cultural offerings of their own city. While Parma is undoubtedly famous for its food products, Reggio Emilia provides a more intimate glimpse into the Emilian way of life. Its smaller scale, combined with less tourist traffic, allows visitors to immerse themselves in authentic Italian culture. The proximity to Parma, just about a 30-minute drive, makes it an easy and worthwhile addition to any itinerary, particularly for those interested in exploring the depths of Italy’s culinary and cultural heritage.

1. Acetaia San Giacomo: Nestled in the rolling hills of Reggio Emilia, the ancient Acetaia San Giacomo is a haven of traditional balsamic production. The owners are passionate about preserving ancient techniques, blending tradition with modern ways. Here, visitors can explore the aging process of the vinegar in different types of wooden barrels in the scent-packed loft, under the careful guidance of Andrea Bezzecchi, the current keeper and an experienced sommelier.

2. Acetaia Cavalli: This law-protected universe of monocultivar vineyards offers a fascinating visit to anyone interested in traditional balsamic vinegar. The Cavalli family, known for their dedication to the environment and traditional methods, opens their acetaia to share the magic of crafting real balsamic vinegar. Through the experience, you’ll witness the journey of the grapes from the vineyard to the meticulously aged balsamic.

While visiting these acetaia, it is evident that true Aceto Balsamico Tradizionale is a labor of love, patience, time, and tradition. The beauty of this product lies not just in its distinct taste that enhances any dish it drizzles over, but also in the heart and history that goes into its creation.

Beyond the acetaias, Reggio Emilia itself is flush with beautiful historical buildings, museums, and galleries, making it a perfect destination for foodies and history enthusiasts alike. The city also offers a variety of taverns and traditional Osteria where you can enjoy traditional Emilian dishes accompanied by locally produced wine and balsamic vinegar.

Emilia-Romagna is a region that thrives on its culinary heritage. To truly feel its spirit, experience its tastes, and understand the tradition that shapes its gastronomy, a visit to its Aceto Balsamico producers is indispensable. Through this journey, you won’t simply be tasting vinegar but witnessing the magic of time suspended in a culinary tradition.

The Essence of Tradition: Aceto Balsamico Tradizionale di Reggio Emilia DOP

Introduction

In the world of gastronomy, few products boast a history as rich and a taste as exquisite as Aceto Balsamico Tradizionale di Reggio Emilia DOP. This traditional balsamic vinegar, a pride of Italy, is not just a condiment but a symbol of culinary heritage and artisan craftsmanship.

Historical Background

The roots of Aceto Balsamico Tradizionale stretch back to the 11th century, with the earliest mention by Monk Donizone in 1046. Originating in the fertile lands of Reggio Emilia, this vinegar became a cherished item among the aristocracy. Over centuries, its production evolved, but the core traditions and methods have remained unaltered, preserving its authenticity and legacy.

Production Process

The making of Aceto Balsamico Tradizionale is an art form. It starts with the careful selection of local grape varieties, primarily Trebbiano and Lambrusco. These grapes are harvested and their juice, or must, is then cooked over a direct flame until it caramelizes and concentrates. This process imparts the must with a deep, rich flavor and color, setting the stage for the magic of aging.

The aging process is where Aceto Balsamico Tradizionale truly comes to life. It’s aged in a series of wooden barrels, often made from different types of wood like chestnut, cherry, oak, mulberry, and juniper. Each wood imparts its own unique flavor to the vinegar. The vinegar is transferred from larger to smaller barrels over the years, concentrating its flavor and developing a complexity that is unmatched. This aging process takes a minimum of 12 years, and in some cases, it extends to over 25 years.

Classification and Quality

The Aceto Balsamico Tradizionale di Reggio Emilia DOP is classified into three categories, each distinguished by a colored label: Bollino Aragosta (Lobster Seal), Bollino Argento (Silver Seal), and Bollino Oro (Gold Seal).

  • Bollino Aragosta is aged for a minimum of 12 years. It’s known for its delicate aroma and pleasantly intense acidity. It’s versatile in the kitchen, perfect for enhancing carpaccio, marinating meats, or adding a refined touch to sauces and dressings.
  • Bollino Argento, aged for longer, offers a balance between sweetness and acidity, making it ideal for more sophisticated dishes. It pairs beautifully with boiled meats, fish dishes, and strong cheeses like Parmigiano Reggiano.
  • Bollino Oro represents the pinnacle of aging, requiring at least 25 years. It’s a treasure trove of flavors, best enjoyed raw to appreciate its full spectrum of aromas. It’s exquisite with fruits, on ice cream, or even by itself, revealing the depth and complexity of its profile.

Producers and Consortium

The Consorzio Tutela Aceto Balsamico Tradizionale di Reggio Emilia DOP oversees the production and upholds the standards of this prestigious product. The consortium consists of 58 certified producers, each committed to maintaining the traditional methods and quality. Many of these producers offer tours and tastings, providing a glimpse into the meticulous process of crafting this culinary jewel.

Culinary Uses and Pairings

Aceto Balsamico Tradizionale di Reggio Emilia DOP elevates any dish it graces. Its versatility allows it to harmonize with a variety of flavors. From simple dressings to complex sauces, it adds a depth of flavor that is unparalleled. Chefs globally use it to accentuate the taste of meats, seafood, vegetables, and even desserts. The complexity of its flavors makes it a favorite for culinary experimentation, bridging the gap between tradition and innovation.

Innovative Products

Recognizing the growing global demand for this exquisite vinegar, producers have introduced ampoules – small, elegantly packaged doses of Aceto Balsamico. These ampoules are not only convenient for personal use but also make for a luxurious and thoughtful gift, embodying the historical significance of Aceto Balsamico as a royal offering.

The Future and Global Appreciation

Aceto Balsamico Tradizionale di Reggio Emilia DOP continues to garner admiration and respect on the global stage. Its unique blend of history, tradition, and flavor keeps it at the forefront of culinary excellence. The meticulous process of crafting this vinegar ensures that each drop is a testament to the dedication and passion of its producers.

As the world becomes more connected, the appreciation for such artisanal products grows. Aceto Balsamico Tradizionale di Reggio Emilia DOP stands as a beacon of Italian culinary heritage, a symbol of the time-honored traditions that continue to inspire and delight palates worldwide.

Conclusion

Ac

eto Balsamico Tradizionale di Reggio Emilia DOP is much more than a condiment. It’s a story of passion, patience, and perseverance. It’s a celebration of Italian culinary art that has stood the test of time. For food connoisseurs and chefs alike, it remains a cherished ingredient, a drop of which can transform the ordinary into the extraordinary. As it continues to grace dining tables across the world, it carries with it a piece of Italian history, a testament to the enduring legacy of quality and flavor.

Exploring Reggio Emilia in 24 Hours: A Journey Through History, Culture, and Culinary Delights

Reggio Emilia, a vibrant city in the Emilia-Romagna region of Italy, is a treasure trove of historical wonders, cultural delights, and culinary experiences. With its rich heritage and contemporary charm, a 24-hour visit to this city promises a journey through time and taste. Here’s how you can make the most of your day in Reggio Emilia.

Morning: Tracing the Roots of the Italian Tricolor

Start your day at the heart of Italian history in the Sala del Tricolore at the Palazzo Municipale. Reggio Emilia is known as the birthplace of the Italian flag, where on January 7, 1797, the tricolor was adopted as the emblem of the Cispadana Republic. The Sala and the adjacent Museo del Tricolore, which offers free admission, provide a fascinating insight into the history of the Italian flag, intertwining with contemporary art and creativity. This iconic spot sets the stage for understanding Italy’s journey to unity and independence.

Late Morning: Discovering the Palazzo dei Musei

Next, visit the Palazzo dei Musei, a recently renovated space designed by architect Italo Rota. This museum complex takes you on a journey through centuries of local and regional history. From the Roman founder Marco Emilio Lepido to the poet Ludovico Ariosto, and from the Este possessions to the photographic works of Luigi Ghirri, the museum encapsulates the essence of the area’s rich cultural heritage. Don’t miss the impressive “Curiosa Meravigliosa” photomosaic on the facade of Via Secchi, a stunning piece of art made from over 12,000 photographs.

Early Afternoon: The Baroque Wonder of La Ghiara

The Basilica della Ghiara, a marvel of baroque architecture, is your next destination. Built in the late 16th century following a miraculous event, the basilica houses an extraordinary collection of frescoes and altarpieces by prominent 17th-century Emilian artists like Ludovico Carracci and Guercino. The adjacent Chiostro Grande and Chiostro Piccolo add to the grandeur of this religious site, with the latter hosting the Museo del Tesoro della Basilica della Ghiara.

Mid-Afternoon: A Contemporary Art and Photography Tour

Reggio Emilia’s contemporary spirit comes alive in the streets. The city’s thriving modern art scene is evident in its public art installations by renowned artists like Luciano Fabro and Sol Lewitt. The “Fotografia Europea” festival, a major event for contemporary photography, transforms various city locations into vibrant exhibition spaces. A short distance from the city center, the Collezione Maramotti offers an impressive collection of contemporary art, housed in a former Max Mara fashion production facility.

Late Afternoon: Architectural Marvels by Santiago Calatrava

Experience the contemporary architectural genius of Santiago Calatrava. His white arching bridges have become the new city gateways, symbolizing Reggio Emilia’s leap into the 21st century. The nearby Mediopadana High-Speed Train Station, a stunning structure of white steel and glass, is another testament to Calatrava’s architectural prowess and is considered one of the most beautiful train stations in the world.

Evening: A Culinary Experience with Erbazzone

As evening sets in, indulge in Reggio Emilia’s culinary specialty – Erbazzone. This savory pie, made with spinach, chard, ricotta, onions, and Parmigiano Reggiano, is a staple in local cuisine. With variations across the region, each version maintains its uniquely Reggian flavor.

Night: Strolling Through the Historic Piazzas

Conclude your day with a leisurely stroll through the historic piazzas of Reggio Emilia. The city’s urban fabric comes alive in these public spaces. Piazza Prampolini, with the Cattedrale, the Municipio, and the Sala del Tricolore, is a must-visit. Piazza San Prospero, Piazza Martiri del 7 Luglio, and Piazza della Vittoria each tell their own story of the city’s past and present. Piazza Fontanesi, once a bustling marketplace, is now a lively spot filled with cafes and gastronomic shops.

Closing Thoughts: A City of Inclusivity and Creativity

Reggio Emilia is a city that embraces everyone – from families to solo travelers, from history buffs to art enthusiasts. The city is home to the Centro Internazionale Loris Malaguzzi, dedicated to innovative educational approaches, and the Fondazione Nazionale della Danza-Aterballetto, a testament to its commitment to the arts. With its bike-friendly streets and scenic parks, Reggio Emilia is not just a destination but an experience, a place

Parmesan Magic and Culinary Delights: An Unforgettable Journey through Italy’s Cheese Factories and Local Cuisine

Parmesan cheese, or Parmigiano Reggiano as it’s authentically known, holds an esteemed place in the world of culinary delights. This cherished cheese, handcrafted in specific regions of Italy, offers not just a unique gastronomical experience, but its creation process is a fascinating spectacle in itself. Embark on this immersive journey through the enchanting cheese factories of Italy, where the allure of Parmesan intertwines with the cultural richness and culinary treasures of each city.

Parma

Your Parmesan journey naturally begins in Parma, the city lending its name to the celebrated cheese. Here, several ‘caseificios,’ or dairy factories, open their doors to tourists, offering guided tours of the meticulous Parmesan making process. From the initial milking of cows to the fascinating transformation of milk into cheese, followed by the extensive aging process, you’re in for an intriguing experience.

Parma is not just about Parmesan, though. This culturally rich city was named the Italian Capital of Culture in 2020. Visit the renowned Teatro Regio opera house and the stunning Parma Cathedral with its Italian Romanesque architecture. Don’t forget to indulge in the city’s signature dish, “Tortelli d’erbetta,” a delightful pasta filled with ricotta, parmesan, and herbs, served with melted butter.

Reggio Emilia

Your next stop is Reggio Emilia, a city teeming with dairies producing authentic Parmigiano Reggiano. An early morning visit lets you witness the cheese-making process in its full glory, right from the fresh morning milk delivery.

As you soak in the city’s vibrant culture, be sure to explore architectural marvels like the Valli Theatre and the Basilica della Ghiara. Reggio Emilia is also famous for its “Erbazzone,” a savory pie filled with spinach, chard, and of course, Parmesan cheese – an authentic taste of the region you won’t want to miss.

Modena

Modena, famous as the birthplace of balsamic vinegar, also takes pride in its Parmesan cheese production. Here, you can witness artisans as they stir massive copper vats of curdling milk and plunge freshly made cheese into a salt bath for flavoring.

After the cheese tour, visit the Enzo Ferrari Museum and the Ferrari Factory if you’re a car enthusiast. Marvel at the city’s UNESCO World Heritage-listed cathedral, Torre della Ghirlandina, and Piazza Grande. While you’re there, enjoy a plate of “Tigelle,” traditional round bread served with a variety of fillings, including cheese, a local delicacy that perfectly embodies the Modena culinary experience.

Mantua and Bologna (designated areas)

The journey continues to specific areas of Mantua and Bologna that also produce Parmesan cheese. Here, you can experience small, family-run farms that have been maintaining Parmesan’s legacy for generations.

In Mantua, visit the Renaissance-era Palazzo Te and the Basilica di Sant’Andrea. The city’s signature dish, “Tortelli di Zucca” (pumpkin ravioli), is a sweet-savory delicacy that will thrill your palate. Bologna, a city renowned for its vibrant food scene, offers landmarks like its medieval towers and the University of Bologna. Do not leave without trying the city’s famous “Tagliatelle al Ragu,” a hearty, slow-cooked meat sauce served over fresh tagliatelle pasta.

As you traverse these regions, you’ll not only gain insight into Parmesan’s artisanal production process but also immerse yourself in the rich culture, historical landmarks, and unique culinary delights of these Italian cities. This journey through the world of Parmesan cheese offers a multi-sensory experience, a testament to the timeless bond between tradition, craftsmanship, and culinary pleasure.

Optimal Seasons for Emilia Romagna Explorations

The Emilia Romagna region, encompassing the cities of Parma, Reggio Emilia, and Modena, offers a wealth of experiences year-round. However, to fully absorb the essence of Parmesan cheese production and the region’s vibrant culture, some seasons stand out as particularly inviting.

Spring (April to June)

Spring is a delightful time to visit Emilia Romagna. As the region bursts into bloom, it’s an excellent season for cheese lovers, as this is when the cows start grazing on fresh grass, contributing to richer, more flavorful milk for cheese production. The weather is typically mild, ideal for sightseeing and leisurely walks through the city streets or the countryside. Spring also sees food festivals celebrating local produce, providing a fantastic opportunity to delve into the regional culinary scene.

Autumn (September to November)

Autumn is another beautiful season to explore Emilia Romagna. The weather is usually pleasant, with the heat of summer subsiding. This time of year, the region is awash with vibrant fall colors, providing a breathtaking backdrop for your travels. Autumn also marks the beginning of the white truffle season, an exquisite delicacy that can be enjoyed at local markets and restaurants. Moreover, in November, the new Parmigiano Reggiano season begins, making it an exciting time to visit the cheese factories.

While summer and winter offer their unique charm, the scorching heat of summer can make touring the cheese factories a bit challenging, and winter may limit your outdoor activities due to shorter daylight hours and colder weather. Nevertheless, the cities of Emilia Romagna remain bustling with cultural and culinary activities throughout the year.

Whether you’re marveling at the cheese-making process, tasting the unique delicacies of each city, or soaking in the rich culture and history, every season brings a different shade of Emilia Romagna to life. So, plan your visit according to your preferences and get ready to be captivated by this enchanting Italian region.

Traveling to the Emilia Romagna region can be quite straightforward, thanks to its well-connected transportation network. Depending on where you’re traveling from, you can choose from several convenient entry points.

By Air

The Emilia Romagna region is serviced by several airports. The Bologna Guglielmo Marconi Airport (BLQ) is the largest and most connected, with flights from several international and domestic locations. It’s a perfect entry point if you’re beginning your trip in Bologna or planning to explore the southern part of the region.

Parma also has an airport, the Parma Giuseppe Verdi Airport (PMF), though with fewer connections. If you’re planning to start your Parmesan journey directly from Parma, this might be a convenient option.

For visitors traveling from within Europe, the Modena Airport (ZMO) offers several connections. However, it’s primarily used for private and sports flights.

By Train

The Emilia Romagna region has an extensive railway network that connects it with other major Italian cities. Bologna’s central train station, Bologna Centrale, is one of the most important railway junctions in Italy. High-speed trains connect Bologna with Milan, Florence, Rome, and Venice, making it easily accessible for those already in Italy or entering from neighboring countries.

By Car

If you prefer a scenic drive, Emilia Romagna can be reached by car from other parts of Italy. The region is well-serviced by motorways, like the A1, connecting Milan to Naples, and the A14, connecting Bologna to Taranto.

Once you’re in Emilia Romagna, the transportation options – whether by train, bus, or car – make it easy to hop between the cities of Parma, Reggio Emilia, Modena, and beyond. Enjoy planning your journey into the heartland of Parmigiano Reggiano production and the rich cultural and culinary delights that await.

Parmesan Cheese Tour From Milan? Yes Please! Stazione AV MEDIO PADANA.

Stazione Medio Padana Reggio Emilia, trains from Milan in 45 minutes

Foodie’s Delight 3 Food Tour: Experience the Culinary Gems of Italy

Are you a food lover and looking for an authentic Italian food experience? Look no further than the Foodie’s Delight 3 Food Tour departing from Modena or Bologna. But did you know that you can also take this tour starting from Milan, Parma or Reggio Emilia, Venice and Verona or Turin? By taking the Italo train or Freccie high-speed trains, you can arrive at Stazione Medio Padana, which is conveniently located near the starting point of the tour.

Stazione Medio Padana is a modern train station that offers various services to travelers, including a food court, luggage storage, and free Wi-Fi. Once you arrive at the station, We can pick up from there!

The Foodie’s Delight 3 Food Tour offers an unforgettable culinary experience that includes three stops: Parmesan cheese production, balsamic vinegar producer, and Villani’s Salami, famous for its Parma ham, mortadella, and prosciutto San Daniele. You’ll have the opportunity to taste and purchase these delicious products at bargain prices.

On Mondays, Tuesdays, and Wednesdays, the tour is automatically upgraded to include a visit to the prosciutto factory, where you can see the full production process of this famous Italian cured meat. On Thursdays, Fridays, and Saturdays, you can upgrade your tour to include a visit to Prosciuttificio Leonardi or Guerzoni instead of MUSA, for a full prosciutto production tour.

Additionally, you can add on a winery brunch or cooking class at an organic winery to extend your foodie adventure. The tour ends at around 13.00 hours, but with the add-ons, it can last until 15.30 or 16.00.

The Foodie’s Delight 3 Food Tour is available 7 days a week and is conducted in English only. Private tours are not available, but the groups are small, ensuring an intimate and personalized experience.

If you’re coming from Milan, Parma, or Reggio Emilia, take advantage of the Italo or Freccie high-speed trains to arrive at Stazione Medio Padana, and then join this fantastic food tour.

If you’re coming from Milan, you can take the Italo train, which takes about 40 minutes to reach Stazione Medio Padana. From Parma or Reggio Emilia, the train ride takes around 15-40 minutes.

Stazione Medio Padana is a modern and stylish train station located in the northeastern part of the city of Reggio Emilia, in the Emilia-Romagna region of Italy. It is an important transportation hub that connects various cities in Italy, including Milan, Bologna, Verona, Venice, and more.

The station was designed by the famous Spanish architect Santiago Calatrava, who is known for his innovative and futuristic designs. The station building features a large and airy atrium with a glass roof, which allows plenty of natural light to filter in. There are also several shops, restaurants, and cafes within the station, making it a convenient place to grab a bite to eat or do some shopping while waiting for your train.

Stazione Medio Padana is well-equipped with modern facilities and amenities, including free Wi-Fi, luggage storage, ticket offices, and information desks. It is also fully accessible to people with disabilities, with elevators and ramps available throughout the station.

If you’re planning to take the Foodie’s Delight 3 Food Tour departing from Modena, Bologna, or any other nearby city, Stazione Medio Padana is an excellent place to start your journey. The station is well-connected to the rest of the city and the region, with several public transportation options available, including buses and taxis.

Timetables available form The Trainline.

Is Reggio Emilia Worth Visiting?

Visitors seeking fun and adventure are most welcome at Reggio Emilio.. To fully appreciate its tourist attractions, travelers are asked to stay for some time. The menu and the Italian flag are some of the most fascinating things.

The Food of Reggio Emilia, Taste Parmesan and Cappelletti.

The famous Parmigiano reggiano cheese produced mainly in Parma and also in Reggio Emilia and consumed widely across the country was born here. Get the chance to enjoy a variety of egg plasta such as the popular cappelletti. This type of egg plasta is irresistible and appetizing, and can be consumed with capon broth or cream. It is believed this delicacy appears to be seductive in men, as it is also thought to have a ‘hat’ sort of shape that recalls both the medieval headgear .

Traditional Deli Antica Salumeria Pancaldi.


Antica Salumeria Pancaldi offers you the chance to taste, buy, and eat directly at the deli prosciutto, parmigiano, balsamic vinegar, and more. Your trip to Reggio Emilia is never complete without tasting the variety of delicacies offered here. For instance, get the chance to grab parma hams and an unimaginable variety of salami at lower prices. What is more is that you can buy these special foods as whole, in slices or in pieces, just was you want it. You can also eat them directly at Antica Salumeria as they now offer seated service. Moreover, their shop also gives you the best quality of cheese known as Parmiggiano Reggiano, which is produced directly in Reggio Emilia countryside along with their traditional Aceto Balsamico. You surely cannot afford to miss this taste.

Stay At Hotel posta in Reggio Emilia.

The 4- star hotel located at the heart of Reggio Emilia in a historical building will offer you a relaxing stay. The conducive atmosphere characterized with history, art, tradition and every modern comfort will leave you mesmerized. Spacious and a supervised car park, recharging of electric cars, free bicycle, free wifi, gym, warm 24-hour reception, disabled friendly environment, bar, lift, pets welcome, safe and luggage store are some of the services you will enjoy.
For people who crave for a place where art,history and tradition is celebrated them this is the spot. As if not enough, the ambience and tranquility of this property gives you the perfect and incomparable modern comfort. Additionally, the hotel’s location right in the center of the oldest part of the city is the right position for a tourist to access Reggio Emilia’s most outstanding attractions.

Italian Flag Museum – Museo Del Tricolore.

The Museum is free and located right in the center of the town of Reggio Emilia. Here is a chance to learn about Italian history through its flag.

The national flag is the most popular of Italian symbols. It consists of three vertical brands of equal width of colors green, white and red. On the hoist side is where the green band is located. The national emblem is designed as a white five-pointed star. In the center it has a red border and a cogwheel. On the right of the wheel there is a branch of an oak and branch of olive on the left. What makes the Italian flag stand out from the rest of the flags around the world is its design in general. The three colors in the flag were initially used by the Cisalpine Republic back in the 1797. Red and white colors were originally the colors of Milan, while the green was the uniform color of the Milanese civic guards.

Today, it is believed the green color represents Italy’s land, the white on the other hand represents the snow-topped peaks of the Alps, while the red is the bold color that represents the blood that was shed during the Italian Independence and Unification war. What is more fascinating is that fact that the three colors have a more deeper spiritual meaning: representing three most important virtues in Italy, which are hope, faith and charity.

In summary, do not miss a chance to visit Reggio Emilia for what it has to offer. From the Parmigiano Reggiano cheese to the cappelletti egg plasta, are delicacies you want to taste. In addition, Antica Salumeria Pancadi offers you more irresistible and appetizing foods to make your trip memorable. What is more is the culture and tradition in Italy which is evidenced on its monumental state symbol such as the Italian flag.

My Best Wilderness Locations in Italy (for Swimming and Bathing) With Video

 

For most travelers, nothing quite beats the thrill of an outdoor adventure. That feeling you get when you step out of the busy urban life is unprecedented. A serene wilderness out there where nature is at its best can be breathtaking.

Factor in a destination with water where you can swim and or bath, and you have more to look forward to. Well, Italy has a fair share of some of the best picks you can consider. You will have many options at your disposal. We have put together four of the best wilderness destination picks for your next trip. If you are planning to enjoy your next getaway, then keep reading to find your perfect next stop.

Golfarone waterfall

golfarone
golfarone

Waterfalls have their own way of making any hike worthy. And this particular one offers an impressive climax to a wilderness adventure. The scenery spot is in a quite remote place in Val d’Asta in Appenninno.

How to get there

This waterfall is about 500 meters off the road; you will need to hike along an isolated path from Civago. The path leading to this waterfall is not marked, but it is rather apparent that you can hardly miss it.

Then wade through Secchiello stream to access the 15-meter high waterfall. Look for the right route so as not to become over exhausted. Below it you will find several hops with shallow but very clear water pools.

What to do once your’e there

Once there, you can have a great time cooling from the heat of the day in the wilderness. The only problem is that since 2017, people cannot swim in these pools. This resulted from numerous injuries as people were jumping off the waterfall and injuring themselves in the shallow pools below. Nevertheless, this small yet fascinating destination offers an ideal stop with its crystal clear water pools.

Only make sure not to go down there with sandals. Trekking down the slope to the waterfall is not as easy as a family walk. Consider bringing with you some ideal hiking boots. If you like being out in the wilderness, then this waterfall is worth a try. It offers all the serenity you would ever ask for in a spot away from the crowds.

Poiano Springs – Fonti di Poiano

These springs offer yet another impressive destination to check out in Italy. They are located in the Villa Minozzo region. The source and the flow itself are quite amazing, with around 600 liters per second flow. The water is highly saline with minerals, both physically and chemically. It has a high level of sodium chloride, which makes it unique and intriguing scenery to visit. The interest in this spot isn’t new; it has been a cause for curiosity since the 1600s. The spot has an even longer history since about 2 million years ago; this area was under the sea. Then the sea evaporated, leaving the salinity in the hills.

It all started with the quest to exploit the area’s salinity. These waters have several therapeutic indications like constipation in the digestive organs, moderate liver dysfunction, and gallbladder disease. Others include diabetes and obesity among others. If you are looking for a relaxing on a picnic day out in the wilderness, then this is it.

How to get there

You can access them off the bridge Gatta in Castelnovo ne’ Monti town, Le Salse locality. Once you leave the town (which is not hard to find once you are in Italy) and proceed down, head for the banks of river Secchia. It only takes about two hours to reach the springs. The sources stand out thanks to their copious and whitish flow. You can take different routes through the woods, or reach it with a car if you so wish. Then enjoy a nice lawn where you can play.

What to do there

Among the things, you can enjoy include the beautiful fish in the flow. The short walk to the scenic destination takes you through paths that let you see the springs from different points. You will find perfect spots to enjoy the sun and relaxing shades under trees. Then there are tables where you can enjoy your lunch.

There’s also a bar and restaurant with impressive services. And yeah, you can take a bath in the end part of the stream as it enters the Secchia River. Among the reasons why these springs are worth a hard look is that they flow all year around. And every time of the year, the scene and the experience is always breathtaking.

Lago Santo Modenese

#lagosanto #cimone #italy #emilaromagna #glaciallake #altitude

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Italy has many exciting destinations to check out, and this lake is one of the top options on the list. The lake is about 1,501 meters above sea level, and formed from partly glacier and partly landslides. At 1250m perimeter, about 20 meters at its deepest point, and around 550 meters it’s the largest natural lake in the Apennines. The lake has three tributaries flowing into it, one flowing from Boccaia, the other from the Serra coast. And the last stream flows from a grassy 150m long, 600m long Borra dei Porci terrace that hangs about 150m above the lake surface.

Accessing this lake is easy from the nearest and largest village – Pievepelago along Brenner road. From here, you can turn to state road that connects to Passo delle Radicci as you head out to the wilderness Then you will find signs for the Tagliole village and Lake Santo. If you are coming from Abetone, you can make use of a recently opened road along the Dogana Nuova region.

Turn to the left, with the Monte Modino massif on your right side, then cross Valle delle Tagliole and several other villages as Ronchi, Rotari, and others. Along the lake’s shores, you can park your car in a large parking lot available. You can reach it easily from a car park in only a few minutes.

What to do there

This makes a scenic destination for anyone seeking to enjoy the Italian wilderness away from the heat of the city. Have an adventurous time and enjoy the cool, clear and fresh waters and fantastic scenery out here. From swimming to bathing, diving and just kicking back and relaxing, the fun is almost endless. There is always a reason to visit this lake; it has a rich history that you can want to relive. But it’s the lovely scene and the fun out there that will blow you away.

Polle di Molbacco

Polle di malbacco #versilia #tuscany #hiking #riverside #italy

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For a place with fresh and cold bathing water, this is where you need to enjoy a hot summer day out in the wilderness. Here, you will find natural pools for an unparalleled experience. It only takes a few minute hike from Versilia. But finding these pools can prove challenging, make sure to have sensible shoes on. Also, be careful with the stepping-stones. You don’t want to bear an excruciating trek back to your villa.

So, how do I get there?

There are many routes to get to these pools. One of these is crossing Pietrasanta, and proceeding right along the riverbank. Head straight to and past Vallecchia, then cross a bridge and take to the right. Another option is approaching from Pietrasanta, head to Querceta, once you reach the second traffic light, proceed to the underpass and take the route to Monti, past Pozzi and Ripa.

Once you get here, the path is mostly the same. When you get past Corvaia, you will find a fork in the river, with an iron bridge to the right, go for the left-side road. This one will take you past Seravezza, Riomago as well as Molbacco. Keep going right ahead, around 1.2 km past Molbacco, you will come to the first pool on your left. There’s also an ample parking space. Proceed for another 2 km, you will find a sign on the left. You can park here and proceed on a footpath that descends about 10 minutes through the woods to Molbacco.

What to do

You can have fun in these pools, bathing and swimming to cool off the hot sun in the wilderness. It’s best to bring with you a packed lunch. And come in the late morning hours for the best experience. Molbacco pools are among the best destinations you can go for, there’s a lot to see and do. The experience is outright unique.

Apparently, Italy has a whole lot to offer for virtually every adventurer. And these four destinations offer some of the best treats by far. You can always step out there and have all the fun in the cool water. Have a scenic view of the virgin wilderness and enjoy the ample environment away from the cities. The fun is ever flowing out there; go and have a share of this bliss.

The culinary traditions of Reggio Emilia

Reggio Emilia is often overlooked by the tourists coming to Emilia Romagna. Reggio Emilia is a medium size town on the Via Emiia situated between Modena and Parma, and it makes the perfect base for the culinary traveller as there are many gourmet foods to be discovered.

Reggio Emilia and Parmesan cheese.

Reggio Emilia is in the cradle of Parmigiano Reggiano. The history of this amazing cheese starts here. Bibbiano has been named the town where the first production started around 900 years ago due to the discovery of the first written accounts of the cheese production. Therefore visiting Reggio Emilia makes perfect sense for those interested in seeing the production of Parmesan cheese.

Traditional balsamic vinegar of Reggio Emilia.

Modena made balsamic vinegar known worldwide but the production of aceto balsamic tradizionale is not restricted to the Modenese province. In the tradition balsamic vinegar was the dowry of young women who would marry and bring the vinegar barrels with them. Due to the close proximity of the two provinces the tradition was also brought in Reggio Emilia. Here it is possible to find more old fashioned producers who make only high quality traditional balsamic vinegar rather than concentrating on industrial vinegar as many do in Modena.

Fresh Egg Pasta: tortelli di zucca.

Of course Reggio Emilia, as all towns in the Emilia Region, produces its own version of fresh egg pasta. One of the most peculiar ones are the Tortelli di Zucca. Sometimes hat or ravioli shaped these parcels are filled with ricotta cheese, parmesan and pumpkin. Some recipes require a hint of crumbled amaretti biscuits in the filling, it is indeed an acquired taste but they can be delicious when topped with melted butter parmesan cheese and a few drops of balsamic vinegar.

A Medieval Pie: Erbazzone.

Erbazzone belongs to the simple farmer’s style cuisine. The women in the kitchen had to come up with something filling and tasty so erbazzone is a pastry made with lard and flour with a filling of chard, spinach, or whatever was in the allotment at the time of preparation. The filling requires to be laced with parmesan cheese, and you could put as much as you could afford. The pastry is pierced with a fork to let vegetable inside to steam when baking in the oven.

Culaccia ham.

Culaccia is a culatello, (the best prosciutto cut) but it is cured with the rind on. This technique allows the meat to stay soft and tender. Culaccia can be found on the Reggio Emilia hills where the climate is drier and away from the foggy plains. In some cases Culaccia beats Parma ham and culatello in tasting competitions. So it is well worth to look for some slices of culaccia in the next trip to Italy.

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erbazzone made the traditional way

Parmesan production video – how Parmigiano Reggiano is made

Normally its cows that are branded, but this is Parmigiano-Reggiano from Italy often referred to as parmesan cheese. Parmesan does start with cows but it’s only their milk we want. This dairy in Mantova, Italy uses half a ton of milk for each block of cheese. It’s made in these huge copper vats. Each one holds 990 liters enough to make two giant Parmesan wheels.

Those cows have a lot of grass to eat to keep up with production. Parmesan is a hard cheese so the milk needs to be solidified. The ideal temperature for this is 33 degrees. To get the milk to solidify, the cheese maker will use rennets. This enzyme comes from calves stomachs, and it’s poured in and left for a moment to work its magic.

Because of strict European laws constraining trademarks. Parmigiano-Reggiano can only be made in certain Italian regions. This means each producer must make as much as they can because global demand is huge. As the rennet takes effect, the head cheese maker will notice subtle changes in the milk’s consistency.

The workers keep a very close eye out so they know when to start the next step. When the time is right, they get to work. Using custom made cutters, they slice through the yogurt-like substance, breaking it into lumps. This helps separate the cheese curds from the whey. After three minutes of this, the temperature is raised and the two parts separate.

The solid curds fall to the bottom leaving the liquid whey at the surface. This custom made knife casts over 4,000 pounds and it’s designed to cut the big lump of cheese at the bottom of the tank in half. In the Parmesan business, high tech goes hand in hand with old school. The cheese master now uses his big wooden paddle to lift the two halves so his colleagues can wrap them in cloth.

If they left the cheese in the bottom of the tank, someone would have to climb inside to get them out. This way is far easier. The workers can now suck out all the old whey, making the tanks ready for the next load of milk. Once the cheese is removed, it’s wrapped up and a weight is put on top. This squeezes out excess fluid.

As a hard cheese, Parmesan needs as little fluid as possible. It’ll remain like this for eight hours in a Teflon-mold. As the cheese spreads out, this imprints the dairy’s name into the sides. After about 24 hours, the Teflon form is substituted for a metal one. Here it will sit down and take on the characteristic wheel shape with a flat top and bottom and curved sides.

After three days in their molds, these cheeses could really do with a bath, a salt bath. This process actually improves that cheesy smell. The cheese is left in this salty brine for a month before it’s taken out to be dried. This helps improve the cheese’s final flavor. Once it’s time to get out of that shag bathwater they make their way to the ripening room.

The contents of this room are estimated have a total value of 17 million pounds and our freshly baked Parmesan wheels are about to join them. The wheels will spend up to two years in here maturing slowly. But to avoid growing mold they have to be turned at least once every two weeks. Turning this many cheeses would be very dull and very hard so a robot is used instead.

Although after doing this job for such a long time it looks like the robots could also do with some turning. As it matures the staff keep a close eye on the cheeses. Using his official hammer the head cheesemaker will tap on a random sample. His expert ear knows the sound of a good Parmesan from a bad one.

He’ll use a little corkscrew to test a sample, and ensure the cheese is maturing nicely. When he satisfied it up to scratch, he’ll fire up his trusty brand and mark the cheese. From it’s humble beginnings via some rather dark and briny bathwater, the world’s favorite pasta topping is born.

The Text has been extracted from this video, the cheese represented is actually Grana Padano and not Parmigiano Reggiano.

httpv://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9BZEy6dSY6Q

 

A video in high quality shot during our gourmet tours in June 2012, with cool music and special effect enjoy.

httpv://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GTm9lqzD9GM

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